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  • Shawn Thornton

A Woman of Courageous Forgiveness

Wednesday - March 16th

Scripture to Read Today: Matthew 6:5-15

 

For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins.

Matthew 6:14-15


During WWII, Corrie ten Boom, the daughter of a Dutch watchmaker, lived in Holland. To avoid having them taken to the concentration camps, she and her family concealed Jews in their home. One day, Corrie and her family were caught and imprisoned by Nazi officers for sheltering Jewish persons.


Young adults at the time, Corrie and her sister Betsie were eventually deported to Ravensbruck, a concentration camp in Germany. Betsie perished at Ravensbruck just days before Corrie's own release on December 31, 1944. Corrie is the only member of her family who survived the Holocaust. Her experience is told in "The Hiding Place," her book (and later a movie).


She described the account of how, years after her liberation from the concentration camp, she met one of the harshest prison guards she experienced and extended forgiveness to him.


Here is Corrie’s account of that moment from "The Hiding Place."


It was in a church in Munich that I saw him, a balding heavy-set man in a gray overcoat, a brown felt hat clutched between his hands. People were filing out of the basement room where I had just spoken. It was 1947 and I had come from Holland to defeated Germany with the message that God forgives. ...


And that's when I saw him, working his way forward against the others. One moment I saw the overcoat and the brown hat; the next, a blue uniform and a visored cap with its skull and crossbones. It came back with a rush: the huge room with its harsh overhead lights, the pathetic pile of dresses and shoes in the center of the floor, the shame of walking naked past this man. I could see my sister's frail form ahead of me, ribs sharp beneath the parchment skin. Betsie, how thin you were!


Betsie and I had been arrested for concealing Jews in our home during the Nazi occupation of Holland; this man had been a guard at Ravensbruck concentration camp where we were sent. ...


"You mentioned Ravensbruck in your talk," he was saying. "I was a guard in there." No, he did not remember me.


"But since that time," he went on, "I have become a Christian. I know that God has forgiven me for the cruel things I did there, but I would like to hear it from your lips as well. Fraulein, ..." his hand came out, ... "will you forgive me?"


And I stood there — I whose sins had every day to be forgiven — and could not. Betsie had died in that place — could he erase her slow terrible death simply for the asking?


It could not have been many seconds that he stood there, hand held out, but to me it seemed hours as I wrestled with the most difficult thing I had ever had to do.


For I had to do it — I knew that. The message that God forgives has a prior condition: that we forgive those who have injured us. "If you do not forgive men their trespasses," Jesus says, "neither will your Father in heaven forgive your trespasses." ...


And still I stood there with the coldness clutching my heart. But forgiveness is not an emotion — I knew that too. Forgiveness is an act of the will, and the will can function regardless of the temperature of the heart. "Jesus, help me!" I prayed silently. "I can lift my hand, I can do that much. You supply the feeling."


And so woodenly, mechanically, I thrust my hand into the one stretched out to me. And as I did, an incredible thing took place. The current started in my shoulder, raced down my arm, sprang into our joined hands. And then this healing warmth seemed to flood my whole being, bringing tears to my eyes.


"I forgive you, brother!" I cried. "With all my heart!"

For a long moment we grasped each other's hands, the former guard and the former prisoner. I had never known God's love so intensely as I did then.


Forgiveness begins with a choice to overcome our feelings and then extend grace to the one who needs forgiveness.

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